screen

printing

Screenprinting was practiced by the Egyptians, Chinese and Pre-Columbian societies. More recently, pop artists like Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein made screen printing popular in the 1960s. Today, screen printing is everywhere.

DEFINE

​Screenprinting is a method of printing used to reproduce a picture or pattern on a surface through the use of ink and stencil. Since its beginnings, screenprinting has become one of the most widely used printing methods in every part of the world. Simple, inexpensive, and fun, screenprinting offers a wide range of creative possibilities.
 
Learn the basic principles of screenprinting, then create an original design to be used on posters and clothing.  

COLLECT INFO

Use the following resources to explore screen printing and find inspiration. Think about what you want your design to communicate.

BOOKS:

The Printmaking Bible, Ann d'Arcy Hughes and Hebe Vernon-Morris

Print Liberation, Nick Paparone, Jamie Dillon, Luren Jenison

Silkscreen Basics: A Complete How-To Manual, Charles Platt
Printmaking: A Complete Guide to Materials & Processes, Beth Grabowski & Bill Fick

Pulled: A Catalogue of Screenprinting, Mike Perry

 

WEBSITES/CLASSES/TUTORIALS:

Learn to Screenprint

And Atelier

Anthony Burrill

 

VIDEO:

Intro to Screenprinting

Getting Started in Screenprinting

Printmaking Processes: Screenprinting

BRAINSTORM IDEAS

What ideas will your screenprint communicate? Consider that printmaking has been used as an artistic tool for protest, activism and social change. During the 1968 student uprisings in Paris, the Atelier Populaire used screenprinting to spread their message. More recently the Amplifier Foundation has used printmaking to address issues of justice and equality in the U.S.

 

Think on it, talk to others around you and find your message, and then get inky with it. Forget about mistakes-- you'll make some and that's okay. There is much to learn and more to gain from getting it wrong and doing it again.

DEVELOP SOLUTIONS

When designing your screenprint, use the iterative process.
1. Design a prototype
Create a quick illustrated design of your screenprint. Remember islands and bridges. Think about what you want to say with your screenprint.
    
2. Create the screen  

Gather the necessary materials, along with your design, and transfer your design to a screen. Test your screen, evaluate the results, and fix the prototype, if necessary. Retest and redesign as needed.
    
3. Analyze your prototype  

Test your prototype. Does it work? If not, determine where the problem is. Make changes and re-test.
    

FINAL DESIGN

When your screen is finished, do some printing and get your message out!

THIS IS A CHORD,

THIS IS ANOTHER,

THIS IS A THIRD. NOW FORM A BAND.

- Sideburns Fanzine, 1977